Posts Tagged ‘hurricane resistant houses’

Deltec’s Best of 2013

Friday, February 14th, 2014

It’s official—2014 is off to a gallop here at Deltec, with every indication that this will be our busiest year since 2008. But 2013 was no slacker year either! We’ve gone through our files and selected, for your enjoyment, the projects that took us to places full of fun and beauty, as well as the biggest, the smallest and the most unusual. We’re not your average prefab home builder, and our list reflects the variety and individuality of our homeowners.

Most Eco-Friendly Home: 1st Renew Collection Home
Fall of 2013 saw us celebrating the first home sold from our new line of high performance and net-zero homes, The Renew Collection. This sleek Ridgeline model will be built in Virginia in the spring of 2014. Our homeowner chose our signature double stud wall for maximum R value, the most efficient choice for high performance homes. The Ridgeline was also our most ‘vetted’ home—both the son and the daughter of this homeowner are LEED professionals and, after careful scrutiny of the plans, gave their seal of approval for mom to purchase a Renew Collection home.

The Most DIY / Smallest Residential Structure: 2-Story 300 sq ft Hampton model = 600 sq ft
Located near Appalachian State University in Western North Carolina, this 600 sq ft tiny home is a work in progress. The shell was built almost completely DIY by our newlywed homeowners, with plenty of help from family and friends.  Said newlywed husband Zaak, “The main reason we chose Deltec was the affordability, but the unique design, customization options and the ability to construct it without professional help were all important factors as well.” Zak and a crew of 8 put the walls up without using heavy equipment. Everything else was done by Zaak and his father, with some assistance from their wives.  We say, “What a way to start a marriage!”

Most Extreme Location: Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Brrr, what do you choose when you are going to build your home in the city that holds the record of the coldest capital on the planet? Winters are long and harsh in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and last about seven months, with -40°F a common occurrence. The subarctic climate means both day and night time temperatures fluctuate within a wide range even in the arc of a single day—in spring and summer, they can range daily from 23°F at dawn to  86°F in the afternoon! Deltecs proven resistance to temperature extremes played a large part in the decision to build with us. Floor plans will be finalized soon and the homes will ship before summer’s end 2014. You might even say we went back to our roots with these clients, since Deltecs were inspired by yurts! Our Mongolian guests recently visited our plant facilities, as well as several Deltec structures.

Most Exotic Use: Ten Hampton Models for a Resort in Gabon, Africa
Ten Deltec Hampton models will serve as individual bungalows in a resort community. At 300 sq ft each, they are the perfect size for independent, exotic vacation bungalows, each featuring a bedroom, sitting area, bath and kitchenette.

Most Unusual Deltec: Rotating B&B ‘Around the Sea
Intriguing, indeed: Our first rotating Deltec home was built on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Homeowners Steve and Stephanie Arnold had plans to construct a round 5,000-square-foot Deltec home for use as a bed and breakfast. Shortly before the design process began, Steve approached us with the idea of a rotating home and thus began our journey to create the world’s first rotating bed and breakfast. Deltec partnered with E Rotating Structures to adapt their 35-ton steel rotating platform to fit the round Deltec structure. After months of collaboration and design efforts, Steve and Stephanie were ready to take in guests in July 2013. Now, from an app on his iPhone, Steve can rotate his bed and breakfast 360-degrees, giving every suite an opportunity for an ocean view. A full rotation takes about 45 minutes. It’s so smooth and quiet, you can’t even tell it’s moving!

Most Amazing Staircase: Unique Spiral Staircase
The home that shipped to Gabon, Africa is sure to give you a severe case of staircase envy. The beautiful 14 foot diameter Half Turn stair, made of 100% Sapele (sa-PEE-lee) Mahogany, was handcrafted by Unique Spiral Stairs. The process time for this stair was over 14 weeks! It was shipped assembled (with the exception of rails and balusters), fully sanded and ready for installation in an open-to-below Deltec Windsor model, still under construction.

The Biggest: Over 6,000 sq ft of Energy Efficient Living
As is often the case with homeowners who build in an isolated area, these homeowners aimed to create a welcoming haven that offered plenty of space for relaxed living, including areas for both their preferred activities and work. A 2-story Vista (5,000 sq ft total) featuring an open-to-below window array on the front of the home blurs the boundaries between indoor and outdoor, bringing the panorama in.  The east wing will lead directly into the master bedroom on the first floor, which has it’s own deck. The west wing is all about work, with the inclusion of a mudroom with washer and dryer between the garage and the main house. The homeowners have cattle, so also planned for plenty of storage space for tools in this wing, with an office just around the corner.  Another consideration in choosing a Deltec home was their inherent energy efficiency, as well as our sustainable manufacturing methods.
This home also boasts the most coveted feature: the east wing will have a lap pool with a spa connected to it!

Top Foreign Location for Deltec Sales: The Caribbean
Bahamas and the US Virgin islands tied for the top Caribbean locations, and that’s not surprising, considering the climates and severe weather patterns. Our homeowners were sold on Deltec’s proven record of hurricane resistant homes, which is repeatedly put to the test every year in tropical locations such as these. If you were building in a hurricane prone area, wouldn’t you want a home able to stand up to category 5 hurricanes?

Most Recreational: Two Summer Camps
Both Camp Tekawitha, in Alabama, and Upper Missouri Ministries Camp & Retreat Center, in North Dakota, chose to go with Deltec for their design flexibility and energy efficiency. Camp Tekawitha built a Monterey with wing for a chapel and dining hall+meeting room. Upper Missouri Ministries chose the same Monterey, building two with wings for chapel and dorm space.

Most Educational: Francine Delany New School for Children
With the addition of this 2,500 sq ft Vista model, Francine Delany New School for Children brought their campus total up to three Deltec buildings. Buffy Fowler, Principal and one of the founding members of the school, says they chose Deltec for their extreme flexibility and sustainability, while project architect Robert Todd says, “On the market today, in my opinion, a Deltec structure for a school is the most effective solution to provide a quality learning environment for the kids. Our experience has shown we can deliver a stronger, more efficient envelope , with abundant natural light using Deltec. We can build with a shorter construction period and lower costs than any other method.”

Best ‘Rebuild’: Jersey Strong in a Deltec
It only takes losing your home to a hurricane once to know you need to build it better. These homeowners chose to build a Deltec home to replace the traditional home they lost in Hurricane Sandy because of our tried-and-true record of never having lost a single home to high winds of any kind, thanks to our inherently aerodynamic shape, and our special high wind construction package. They also wisely decided to put their Deltec Sierra model on pilings, a safeguard against high water should they find themselves in another storm of such epic proportions. (Not pictured.)

Top banner, clockwise from top left: The Most DIY / Smallest Residential Structure; Most Eco-Friendly Home: 1st Renew Collection Home; The Biggest: Over 6,000 sq ft of Energy Efficient Living; Most Recreational: Two Summer Camps; Most Educational: Francine Delany New School For Children; Most Unusual Deltec: Rotating B&B ‘Around the Sea’;  Most Exotic Use: Ten Hampton Models for a Resort in Gabon, Africa; Most Amazing Staircase: By Unique Spiral Stairs. Footer photos, from the left: Top Foreign Location for Deltec Sales: The Caribbean; Most Extreme Location: Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Our Mongolian visitors toured our plant facilities and model home, as well as a local school.

Jersey Strong in a Deltec Home

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

When last we saw Deltec homeowners John and Kathy Guerin, it was 2010 and they had just finished building their dream home on the Jersey shore. Little did they know that not even two years later, their desire for a home that was “resistant to the winds coming off the Bay” would be put so severely to the test.

The Guerin's 'Jersey Strong' Deltec looks surreal in its perfection, in the midst of destroyed vegetation, bulkheads and damaged homes along Delaware Bay after Hurricane Sandy.

The 2,000-square-foot home is situated squarely on Delaware Bay, offering panoramic views of the water and wetlands. In anticipation of seasonal high water, the two-story house stands on pilings six feet off the ground. Unlike many homes along this beach, the Guerins, in defense of their ocean view and with complete trust in their Deltec, opted to skip erecting a bulkhead in front of their home. When Hurricane Sandy slammed the New Jersey coast last fall, the Guerins witnessed the true hurricane resistance of their Deltec: Although many nearby properties, even those ‘protected’ behind a bulhead, suffered significant water and wind destruction, the only damage to their home was a single turned-up shingle on the roof. Indeed, the bulkheads themselves were destroyed so as to be useless.

“The house withstood the storm very well,” said John Guerin to the press. “That’s one of the reasons we chose the Deltec design.”

Sandy was the second-costliest hurricane in U.S. history. With the forecasters expecting 2013 to be an above average hurricane season, you can bet many will be keeping their eyes on Deltec Homes.

When their Deltec dream home made the news in 2010, the Guerins had no idea that Hurricane Sandy would put the hurricane resistance of their home to the test.

Hurricane Bud Heralds Early Start of 2012 Hurricane Season

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Hot on the heels of Tropical Storm Alberto, Hurricane Bud confirms an early start to the 2012 hurricane season, which does not officially start until June 1. Effectively, we are already in a weather pattern similar to the middle of June.

As the hurricane season takes off, it’s important to stay informed. Stay up-to-date with AccuWeather.com’s Hurricane Center, and follow the storm in real-time with their interactive hurricane tracker.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) also offers updated weather information and a checklist for assembling a disaster supply kit, useful whether you will need to evacuate or stay safely tucked in your home. The NHS reminds us that a hurricane watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds…conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

This makes it all the more urgent to hurricane-proof your home as much as possible ahead of time, before a storm strikes. Here are storm-proofing guidelines from Joseph Schlenk, Fortified Home Expert, Deltec Homes, a builder of prefabricated homes with a long history of hurricane resistance.

Trees Trim out dead wood and limbs that could scrape or fall on the house.

Roof Install additional braces in the trusses. A qualified builder can install galvanized metal hurricane straps to secure the roof to the walls. Wait until after hurricane season to replace old roofs.

Gutters Make sure gutters are clean, functioning properly and water from downspouts does not pool near the house.

Pool Lower the water level by a foot or two. Stock up on chemicals to shock the pool after the storm.

Screens Secure or remove screen doors. Remove items that could be blown through screens.

Patio Remove furniture, flower pots, grills, firewood, etc. to a secure place. Patio furniture can be stored in the pool.

Doors Install beefier hinges to make outside doors stronger. Reinforce garage doors by bracing each panel, adding stronger supports and heavier hinges.

Windows Options include hurricane shutters, plywood covers or clear plastic window film. Shutters are effective but relatively expensive. Plywood covers are a good DIY option. Purchase, cut and label plywood covers ahead of time, and install before the wind strengthens. Adhesive window film helps prevent glass from shattering only if anchored in the window frame.

Valuables Move valuable rugs, furniture, pictures, books, etc. away from windows. Store where they are least likely to suffer water damage. Lock important papers and jewelry in the dishwasher.

Supplies Stock up on gas or charcoal for the grill, lights that are gas- or battery-powered and extra ice chests. If you plan on purchasing a generator, do so before the last-minute rush.

Insurance Go over your insurance coverage, including flood insurance, with your agent. Get recommendations from your agent or check online for disaster-relief contractors and have the names and contact numbers of a couple handy — just in case.

Deltec Homes is known for building hurricane force wind resistant round homes worldwide since 1968. Read Deltec homeowner hurricane survival stories here.

The Advantages of Round Homes

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Round home advantages are so overwhelming that the press continues to cover this unique style of home.  This month, eHow Home published an article outlining three major advantages:  energy efficiency, resistance to hurricanes and less costly to build. Read the highlights of the article below.

Energy Efficiency

  • It’s not inexpensive to heat and cool most traditional houses. Round houses, though, because of their unique design, come with lower utility bills.

    That’s because round homes have less surface area to come into contact with adverse weather conditions such as excessive heat or cold. Because of this, it takes less effort for furnaces and air conditioners to regulate their interiors to comfortable temperatures.

    Round homes are also more aerodynamic. They experience fewer drafts because of this, again making the job of the furnace or air-conditioning unit an easier one.

Hurricane Resistance

  • Round homes are also more resistant to hurricane-level winds. It’s the round shape that receives credit for this. Strong winds travel around round homes. These same winds, though, beat strongly against the face of traditional homes, eventually destroying these residences if the winds are strong enough. Round homes can be good alternatives in parts of the country prone to hurricanes or tornadoes.

Less Costly to Build

  • It’s not inexpensive to build a traditional home. Round homes, though, can cost significantly less to construct. The reason is a simple one: They take less time to build.

    Traditional homes, with their multiple surfaces, are complicated structures. Round homes, though, are relatively simple: Most round homes are sold as kits. Construction crews can erect them quickly simply by following the kit instructions, saving homeowners a significant amount of labor charges.

    Round homes also require fewer raw materials than do traditional homes. This, again, saves a significant amount of money for homeowners.

Why a Circular Home Saves Energy

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

Syndicated columnist, Jim Dulley, wrote an extensive column on Deltec Homes in February 2011 that has appeared in several publications. In it, he explains how the circular design saves energy and is built to last.

Question-Dear Jim: I am planning to build a new house. I want one which is very energy efficient, but still livable. I know that standard stick-built is not the most efficient. What construction methods do you recommend? – Pete S.

Dear Pete: You are wise to think about the livability of a house in addition to its energy efficiency. It is possible to build a small simple house with thick insulation and very few windows to save energy, but it likely would not suit most typical American families. You should balance the energy efficient aspects with comfort and convenience. Often, by making minor life-style changes, your family can dramatically reduce its utility bills even in a less efficient house.

Deltec home in Norwood, NC

The typical “to-code” stick-built house is not very energy efficient, but this does not necessarily mean all stick-built houses are inefficient. With adequate (more than to-code) insulation, high-quality windows and doors and attention to construction details, a typical lumber-framed house can be very efficient. The attention to detail, such as in sealing all the vapor/air barriers, is particularly important as it relates to the air tightness of a house.

There are several newer house construction methods which are inherently much more efficient than a rectangular lumber stick-built house. These methods include round panelized, geodesic dome, steel-framing, foam block/concrete, SIPS (structural insulated panels), and post-and-beam houses.

A round house is particularly energy efficient for several reasons. A circle provides the greatest amount of indoor floor space with the least amount of exterior wall surface area. Since heat loss (or gain) from a house is directly related to wall surface area, less wall area results in less losses. Also, winds tend to flow smoothly over the exterior resulting in fewer air leaks into and out of a house.

Read full article JAMES DULLEY ARTICLE FEB 2011

Contact Deltec Homes to learn about our circular, energy efficient homes at 800-642-2508 or visit www.deltechomes.com

Asheville Area Homeowners Tell Local Newspaper Why They Built a Round Home

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Bob and Lynn Montgomery of Lake Adger, NC explained to the local newspaper why they chose to build a round home when they moved to Asheville from Charlotte, NC.

“We wanted a house that embraced its surroundings and Deltec provided the perfect home, says Bob, “but our design does even more than that; our home blends in and shakes hands with the mountains.”

The Montgomery’s built a Sierra (1600 square feet) over a basement with a connector and wing. They enjoy long range views of the mountains of Western North Carolina year-round.


“You couldn’t ask for a better company to work with than Deltec,” says Bob, “or better people. They stand behind their products and continually improve themselves.”

Thank you Bob and Lynn for sharing your Deltec story!

Read the Asheville Citizen Times full story by clicking  here.

Research team keeps 2010 forecast at 10 hurricanes

Monday, August 9th, 2010

MIAMI — The Colorado State University hurricane forecasting team on Wednesday maintained its 2010 Atlantic hurricane season forecast at 10 hurricanes, five of them expected to be major.  So far the season has produced three tropical storms, one of which grew to hurricane strength. But the season is just approaching its traditional busy phase, which runs from mid- August to October.

The team said there was a 49 percent chance that a major hurricane would hit land along the Gulf of Mexico between Florida and Texas, a region still cleaning up from the BP spill. Read the full story here.

Many Deltec homeowners live in hurricane prone areas and after having their conventional homes destroyed, they chose to rebuild with a Deltec.  What we hear from homeowners is that they don’t want to make the same mistake twice. Why put a home design in an environment where it will most likely fail?

Deltec still standing after Hurricane

“Everything around us was destroyed as the eye of Ivan passed directly over us. Damage around us was unbelievable. Our family stayed in the home during the hurricane. There weren’t even any shingles gone from the roof, but the trees outside were completely twisted apart.” – Gregg H., Butler, AL

Read more Deltec homeowner testimonials.

First Atlantic Hurricane Hits June 30, 2010

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

Everyone is watching Hurricane Alex as it hits Mexico and southern Texas today. The category 1 hurricane was far from the oil spill cleanup, but rough seas pushed more of the oil onto Gulf coast beaches and cleanup vessels were sidelined by the hurricane’s ripple effects.

Alex had winds of 80 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center, and it was the first June hurricane in the Atlantic since 1995, the center said.

Alex’s storm center at midday was about 190 miles southeast of Brownsville, the NHC said, to the south and west of the BP oil spill. It was moving in a west-northwest direction at about 7 mph.

The hurricane could become a Category 2 storm with winds above 96 mph before slamming into the coastline Wednesday evening or early Thursday about 100 miles south of Matamoros and Brownsville. The flat, marshy region is prone to flooding.

Read more here. To learn more about Deltec’s hurricane wind resistant homes, click here.

How To Protect Your Home From Hurricanes Now

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010
Orlando Sentinel, June 15, 2010

Now is the time to make sure your home is as hurricane-proof as possible. Once the weather reporters don their yellow slickers, it’s usually too late to effectively protect against hurricane-force winds and deluging rains, said Scott McCurdy of Coastal Reconstruction, a general contractor who specializes in restoration from natural disasters.

Hurricane Charley

“Be prepared. It won’t prevent all storm damage, but it will offer some protection and help you deal with the aftermath,” said McCurdy, who has cleaned up after “about 12 hurricanes and countless tropical storms, tornadoes and lightning strikes.”

Here are storm-proofing guidelines from McCurdy and Joseph Schlenk, Fortified Home Expert, Deltec Homes, a builder of prefabricated homes.

Trees. Trim out dead wood and limbs that could scrape or fall on the house.

Roof. Install additional braces in the trusses. A qualified builder can install galvanized metal hurricane straps to secure the roof to the walls. Wait until after hurricane season to replace old roofs.

Gutters. Make sure gutters are clean, functioning properly and water from downspouts does not pool near the house.

Pool. Lower the water level by a foot or two. Stock up on chemicals to shock the pool after the storm.

Screens. Secure or remove screen doors. Remove items that could be blown through screens.

Patio. Remove furniture, flower pots, grills, firewood, etc. to a secure place. Patio furniture can be stored in the pool.

Doors. Install beefier hinges to make outside doors stronger. Reinforce garage doors by bracing each panel, adding stronger supports and heavier hinges.

Windows. Options include hurricane shutters, plywood covers or clear plastic window film. Shutters are effective but relatively expensive. Plywood covers are a good DIY option. Purchase, cut and label plywood covers ahead of time, and install before the wind strengthens. Adhesive window film helps prevent glass from shattering only if anchored in the window frame.

Valuables. Move valuable rugs, furniture, pictures, books, etc. away from windows. Store where they are least likely to suffer water damage. Lock important papers and jewelry in the dishwasher.

Supplies. Stock up on gas or charcoal for the grill, lights that are gas- or battery-powered and extra ice chests. If you plan on purchasing a generator, do so before the last-minute rush.

Insurance. Go over your insurance coverage, including flood insurance, with your agent. Get recommendations from your agent or check online for disaster-relief contractors and have the names and contact numbers of a couple handy — just in case.

Deltec Homes is known for building hurricane force wind resistant round homes worldwide since 1968.  Read Deltec homeowner hurricane survival stories here.

Deltec Home Survives Hurricane Dennis

National Hurricane Preparedness Week

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010
History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster. Hurricane Preparedness Week is next week, May 23-29.

The goal of the Hurricane Preparedness Website is to inform the public about the hurricane hazards and provide knowledge which can be used to take ACTION. This information can be used to save lives at work, home, while on the road, or on the water.

The intensity of a landfalling hurricane is expressed in terms of categories that relate wind speeds and potential damage. According to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, a Category 1 hurricane has lighter winds compared to storms in higher categories. A Category 4 hurricane would have winds between 131 and 155 mph and, on the average, would usually be expected to cause 100 times the damage of the Category 1 storm. Depending on circumstances, less intense storms may still be strong enough to produce damage, particularly in areas that have not prepared in advance.

Hurricane-force winds can easily destroy poorly constructed buildings. The strongest winds usually occur in the right side of the eyewall of the hurricane. Wind speed usually decreases significantly within 12 hours after landfall. Nonetheless, winds can stay above hurricane strength well inland. Hurricane Hugo (1989), for example, battered Charlotte, North Carolina (which is 175 miles inland) with gusts to nearly 100 mph.

 

Deltec Homes have faced almost every major hurricane over the last four decades without a single home suffering structural damage.  Names like Katrina, Ivan, Hugo make most people think of billions of dollars in damage and thousands of homes lost.  To Deltec homeowners, these storms represent maybe a few lost shingles and that’s it.  To read Deltec homeowner testimonials, click here.  Hurricane season officially kicks off June 1st so stay tuned for more information.